“REVISITING FIELDWORK: ON BECOMING A FEMINIST ETHNOGRAPHER”

Written by Carolyn I. Sobritchea,PhD Professor and Former Dean, Asian Center, UP Diliman.

In Selected Readings on Health and Feminist Research: A Sourcebook, Sylvia Guererro (ed). QC: UP Center for Women's Studies, 2002. 362 Pages.

(About the Author: Professor Sobritchea completed her  A.B. Anthropology (1968), M.A. in Asian Studies,  (1973) and  Ph.D. in Anthropology (l987) from the University of the Philippines. She was a recipient of the , University of the Philippines (1987) She was a recipient of the Fulbright-Hays  Doctoral Enrichment Studies in Anthropology,  State University of New  York (SUNY)  from 1979-1980.)


WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO BE A FILIPINO WOMAN ANTHROPOLOGIST?

As a student of anthropology in the late sixties and early seventies, I learned that fieldwork was the most important qualification for becoming a genuine anthropologist. Our professors, most of whom were trained in the tradition of American social science, impressed on the young minds of students the research standards of doing "thick descriptions" of community life, taking a holistic view 'of social events and being sensitive to people's perspectives and points of view. With my passion for traveling and learning about other people's culture, I spent many years after graduation from college, doing fieldwork in several communities around the country. I served as research assistant of a male senior anthropologist documenting "folk" medical beliefs and practices; doing ethnographies of fishing and farming economies as well as studies of socialization patterns in urbanizing communities.